New York City Front Impact Accident Lawyer

A frontal impact collision claims more lives than any other type of automobile accident. There are several ways a motorist can be involved in a frontal impact collision. The subcategories of frontal impact include collisions into a stationary object (pole, wall, etc.), collisions with oncoming vehicles ("head-on"), collisions with the rear of a vehicle moving in your same direction, and collisions into the side of a vehicle moving perpendicular to your vehicle.

Have you or someone you know been injured due to a frontal impact collision? Contact our Front Impact Attorney to represent your case today.

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When you are in an automobile accident, the car is not the only "object" that is involved in the collision.

Our Front Impact Attorneys can help with other accident related issues:

In each car crash there are actually three collisions:

  • The Car's Collision
  • The Human Collision
  • The Human Body's Collision

During a crash, the car crashes to a stop. At 30 mph, a car hitting an object that is not moving will crumple in about two feet. As the car crushes, it absorbs some of the force of the collision.

The second collision is the "human collision". At the moment of impact, passengers in the car are still traveling at the vehicles original speed. When the car comes to a complete stop the passengers continue to be hurled forward until they come in contact with some part of the automobile. For example, the steering wheel, the dashboard, the front window or back of the front seat. Humans in a crash can also cause serious injuries to other humans when they collide with each other. People in the front seat of a car are often hit by rear-seat passengers as they fly forward with incredible force.

In a crash, even after a human body comes to a complete stop, its internal organs are still moving. Suddenly, these internal organs slam into other organs or the skeletal system. This "internal collision" is what often causes serious injury or death.

It's no wonder why people get injured during car accidents. Not only are there physical damages to your vehicle and to the outside of your body, but internal injuries are also very common.

Have you or someone you know been injured due to a frontal impact collision? Contact our Front Impact Attorney to represent your case today!

When it comes to crash testing, there are two organizations that keep score: the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Though both organizations test for safety, they conduct their tests in different manners. When buying a car, everyone looks at the crash test rating, but do you know what the crash ratings actually mean?

In the NHTSA frontal crash test, two crash test dummies the size of average adult men are placed in the driver and front-passenger seats secured with the vehicle's seatbelts. The vehicle is then crashed head-on into a fixed barrier at 35 miles per hour, which is the equivalent of two vehicles of similar weight hitting each other head-on at 35 mph. The force of the impact to the dummies is measured, and NHTSA gives the vehicle a star rating based on the percent chance of serious injury (meaning an injury that requires immediate hospitalization and may be life-threatening) to the head and chest.

NHTSA's star ratings are as follows:

  • 5 Stars = 10 percent or less chance of injury
  • 4 Stars = 11-20 percent chance of injury
  • 3 Stars = 21-35 percent chance of injury
  • 2 Stars = 36-45 percent chance of injury
  • 1 Star = 46 percent or greater chance of injury

Now that you know what the crash ratings mean, it will be easier for you to choose a vehicle that will deliver the ultimate amount of safety if you are ever in a car accident.

Have you or someone you know been injured due to a frontal impact collision? Contact our Front Impact Attorney to represent your case today!